Disability

My wheelchair is not a prison!

This is a wonderful post written by Nina Childish! As I sit here anxiously awaiting the arrival of my new power chair I can 100% relate!! Please click on the post below to check out her blog!

nina childish

Since becoming visibly disabled in 2013, after several years in the invisible camp, I have been anxious about seeing people I used to know, and meeting new people. Not just the inevitable “what happened?” (answer: “technically nothing, I was born with this”), but the misguided sympathy I now get for being a wheelchair user. Non-disabled people tend to see the wheelchair as The Worst Thing That Could Ever Happen to someone – look at the terminology used: wheelchair-bound; stuck in a chair; confined to a wheelchair…. but they don’t think of the alternative. Before I had my electric wheelchair, I would leave the house once or twice a week, as it caused me that much pain to walk and the knock on effects weren’t worth it. Now, as long as I’m not in a bad fatigue phase, and can get what passes for “dressed” enough, I can go out multiple…

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Disability, Invisible Illness, Loneliness

The Herdless Zebra: When You’re Too Rare to Fit In with the Zebras

So we know that Zebras are rare, but what happens to those Zebras who are so rare that the other Zebras don't even know who they are? I've been having a lot of medical setbacks lately, and have been struggling to get answers. We all know that the doctors aren't always the best at understanding… Continue reading The Herdless Zebra: When You’re Too Rare to Fit In with the Zebras

Coping, Disability, Loneliness

When Medical Setbacks Change the Face of Your Chronic Illness

The thing about living with chronic illnesses is they are never static. Every day symptoms wax and wane. Some days are better than others, but the symptoms are always present. However, sometimes changes happen when you just know that it is a stage of evolution in your illness that will change how you manage each… Continue reading When Medical Setbacks Change the Face of Your Chronic Illness